Connect with us

Entertainment

11 years after the Death of Dagrin, The Music Industry Still Miss his sick flows

Published

on

On this day, 11 years ago at 8:30 p.m. local time LUTH Idi-Araba, the Nigerian music industry was thrown into commotion and mourning following the announcement of the death of rapper Dagrin, one of the most promising rappers the industry had seen. The waters rose in disbelief as the news of his death spread like wildfire when his career was beginning to get a new shape.

Dagrin is also known as Barrack O’grin, born Oladapo Olaitan Olaonipekun, was born on October 25, 1984, died on April 22, 2010 at age 25. Dagrin remains one of the Nigerian rappers who revolutionised the Nigerian rap industry with his music rich in Cultural values using his mother tongue Yoruba infusing a little of Nigerian broken English. He depicted a thug life synonymous with street rappers who went from grass to grace in his journey.

In honour of the music icon, a film of his life titled Ghetto Dreamz, starring Trybson Dudukoko, and Doris Simeon-Ademinokan as his girlfriend was made and released in April 2011. The movie title was inspired by a track off his “CEO” album titled “Ghetto Dreams.”

The movie, a creation of movie director, Lancelot Imasuen, and Sringomania Entertainment, chronicles the growing years of Da Grin, his struggles, his rise to fame, and death.

In the very short time he spent in the industry, Da Grin released one of the most critically-acclaimed albums titled “C.E.O. (Chief Executive Omota English: Chief Executive Gangster)” that won the Hip hop World Award 2010 for best rap album.

He worked closely with Y.Q, 9ice, M.I, Iceberg Slim, Omobaba, Terry G, Ms Chief, Owen G, K01, code, MISTAR DOLLAR, TMD entertainment, Omawumi, Chudy K, Bigiano, and Konga. He associated with music producers like Sossick, Dr Frabz, Sheyman, Frenzy, and 02.

Dagrin played a pivotal role in what has been widely accepted as mainstream street hip hop today. His style of music made him a cultural icon even after his passing and a point of reference in major music-related discussions.

His songs touch upon ethnicity, pride while surviving the streets of Lagos and a hint of criticism elderly people hurl against bad behavior. Da Grin was the mouthpiece of the streets. His music mirrored the struggle of the average Lagos ghetto hustler trying to survive in a world of inequality. His song Ghetto Dream laid emphasis on his dreams, hopes, and aspirations.

His legacy is evident in the type of music that sprung after his passing, and the number of artists that picked up the baton from where he left off. A perfect example is a road he paved for artists like Olamide, Zlatan, Naira Marley, among others, to find their path in an industry that was still at its teething stage.
The industry had seen indigenous rappers who fused English (pidgin) and Yoruba, but no one made it as sonically appealing as Da Grin did. Some of his hottest award-winning singles Pon Pon Pon, and Kondo, remodeled how music was recognized. He was able to bridge the gap between core hip hop and pop music.

In 2009, Da Grin was a guest at DJ Jimmy Jatt’s Jump Off, which was a platform that created exposure for rappers. His appearance on that episode was so impressive that it became evident that this young Lagos rapper was going to be a force to be reckoned with among his contemporaries. It is argued until this day that some of the Yoruba indigenous rappers we have today would not have been this relevant if Da Grin had lived longer than he did.

Before his death, Da Grin released a song titled “If I Die,” which sounded like a prophecy or a premonition of his death. The song was almost too accurate to be a coincidence and it remains a mysterious question to date. Did he know he was going to die? The lyrics of the song felt like he was sending cryptic messages of what was to come. This remains a question we will never get answers to. Whatever the case may be, the industry will never forget a pioneer in mainstream hip hop, an icon whose legacy paved the way for others to follow. Da Grin, gone but not forgotten.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Opinion

Sesan Adeniji: We Won The Grammy Awards, But What’s Next Nigerian Artistes To Do And Conquer?

Published

on

By

 

 

It has been months since the news of Burna Boy and Wizkid winning the Grammy Awards, which made both the first homegrown Nigerian artists to win the most coveted prize in world music, the Holy Grail legends before them could not attain. With such massive achievements in the bag, the nagging question now is, what’s next for Naija musicians to do and conquer?

 

The answer to that specific question will determine if we will dominate the world music scene for a long time or become a flash in the pan. Burna Boy and Wizkid will push the envelope, but they can’t rule forever. I also know that in this country, we have a culture of Me Alone. But the only way we can maintain this recent world recognition/commendation and conquer more territory is to have a concerted effort to seed more talents into the international entertainment market.

 

Like in football, the earlier a country exposes and exports a stream of young talents into international competition, the earlier they will put together a chunk of experienced players to dominate and reach the finals of countries’ tournaments. Likewise, in the music industry, the earlier we discover and shine enough spotlights on young talents by exporting their music to the world, the earlier we stand a chance to dominate world music.

 

Nowadays, the music business is more than just musicians, so the narrative should be about exporting the content of Nigerian artists, dancers, models, entertainment writers, music producers, video directors, OAPs, and A&Rs. The more music and music-related content creators we seed, the more we will positively shape our Afrobeats narratives, conquer the music corridors and have corner offices in the world music market.

 

Sesan Adeniji: Entertainment Journalist | A&R

Instgaram- @sesanadeniji

 

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Society Reporters Excellence Leadership Awards Set To Reward Ingenuity, Hardwork

Published

on

By

As the countdown to the talk of the town Society Reporters Excellence Leadership Award (SRELA) begins, some high-profile personalities and captains of industry are getting set to be rewarded for their ingenuity and hard work over the years. The award presentation packaged by society reporters will kick off in August 2021. Society Reporters, a reputable news platform that serves as the watchdog of society; bringing to the fore pertinent issues into limelight. 

The debut edition of SRELA is special recognition excellence and leadership award that will add value to the carefully selected awardees and recipients for the year. It will also enhance their credibility, and reinforce the leadership stance of recipients in their field of endeavors.

Over the years, the platform has broken top society stories and other grand breaking scoops and jist within the elites. Staging Society Reporters Excellence Leadership Awards (SRELA) is another feat for the online platform that stands out amongst its contemporaries.

“Society Reporters Excellence Leadership Award (SRELA) is positioned to be an epoch-making event in the society like no other to celebrate and honor those that deserve the crest and creating unity in various industries across the board” disclosed an associate.

Checks also revealed that Society Reporters is a reputable platform that shines the light on elite society members, and the organizers have concluded plans to use this opportunity to stage an excellent award and throw even more of the spotlight on those who have made a difference in society regardless of the sector.

No doubt, Society Reporters Excellence Leadership Awards (SRELA) is an exclusive annual event to honor excellence and leadership with limitless imagination and bold execution to foster unity among the top players in various sectors at large, said the Publisher, Mr. Sunday Adebayo.

More so, the Awards aim to celebrate the commendable feats that define the personality of awardees/recipients; feats that have secured their position as high flyers with excellent perception and outstanding ratings in their respective categories.

The industry watchers also squealed that Society Reporters Excellence Leadership Awards is a good platform for the Recognition for Your Achievements, Exposure for You And Your Organization, and Access to Industry Leaders. And they wish to advise any prospective recipients not to miss this golden opportunity from Society Reporters.

The Governing Board of the Society Reporters Excellence Leadership Awards (SRELA)  headed by the Publisher Sunday Adebayo, and the Selection Panel for the SRELA 2021 edition has jointly ratified the selection of reputable recipients for the maiden edition that would be unveiled officially soon.

Continue Reading

Opinion

Sound Sultan: The Poetic Ambassador on Migration UN never had

Published

on

By

‘Motherland’, referring to Nigeria in his song, at the time of its release, was so timely and its messages even till the present day is rich and timeless as it could be passed off as an Immigrant travel guide. The early part of the song had reminded us about how Chinedu had borrowed some money to fund his trip to Chicago. It further adds: how Nnamdi had also sold off his car to facilitate the trip of a beloved to America. In the middle of it all is also the emotionally drained lover or spouse left behind, whose wellbeing and fragile mind is left hanging in the balance, sadly in some instance, some partner never returns.
The song perhaps appears to have critically observed the obsession of many immigrants whose inordinate or misplaced quest for survival believes that immigrating to the West or other European countries is a critical means by which survival is sought, hence Sound Sultan’s ‘Motherland’ came in handy: offering some counsel, suggesting that sometimes, a sojourner may have to beat a retreat by returning to his ancestral home, Motherland, given the fact that sometimes, in a bid to survive in a foreign land, the unpredictability of such adventures may unavoidably require one to do so.
As often the case with many immigrants from Nigeria and by extension many others from African countries, who had at one time or the other undertaken such adventurous trips in search of greener pasture abroad, even the period leading to their departure also comes at a great cost and sacrifices as some families sell off assets and other prized possessions to fund such trips, unsure whether the risk would eventually pay off or not.
While the craze in search of the golden fleece rage on, some Africans in their desperation may have also thrown caution in the air, leading to situations where thousands have reportedly died in the wake of risky voyages across Mediterranean or Sahara wastelands, as hundreds have also fallen prey to wild beasts, transnational armed syndicate and human traffickers who deal in drugs and sex slaves, having promised many unsuspecting victims an elusive eldorado life, waiting for them in Europe. Many African households have believed some of these false narratives built into their psyche for many years and it has become so difficult to undo.
The Late singer was never opposed to the idea of people seeking better opportunities or greener pastures outside the country, but rather also reminds them about home and the need for them to apply cautious optimism where applicable, in their quest to traveling overseas.
Notwithstanding, the home would still be home regardless of the prevailing circumstance which may have forcibly led to one’s uneventful return.
This writer believes, Late Olarewaju Fasasi fondly called Sound Sultan, as a social crusader, an iconic singer using his musical crafts as a vehicle to remind us about the need to be introspective, also feels compelled to note that ‘Motherland,’ mirroring the life of most Immigrants and some of the challenges often associated with it, brings to the fore also a social problem and the need for concerned International Organizations like UN and its relevant agencies to do more in terms of advocacy and policies in reversing the tales of woes of many migrants.
Though UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development recognizes for the first time the contribution of migration to its sustainable development, thus, 11 out of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) contain targets and indicators relevant to migration or mobility for which parts of its Agenda’s core principle is to “leave no one behind,” not even migrants.
The SDGs’ central reference to migration is made in some of its major targets, which is to facilitate orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies. Other targets directly related to migration mention trafficking, remittances, international student mobility, and more. Moreover, migration is indirectly relevant to many more cross-cutting targets.
UN, more recently, through International Organization on Migration, a leading partner on the inter-governmental organization in the field of migration works to ensure the orderly and humane management of migration, to promote international cooperation on migration issues, to assist in the search for practical solutions to migration problems and to provide humanitarian assistance to migrants in need, including refugees and internally displaced people.
In 2016, IOM entered into an agreement with the United Nations, becoming one of its specialized agencies.
However, the above plans and efforts of UN appear commendable but today’s realities in some part of Europe and other Asian countries, judging by their immigration policies at present largely remains a far cry from the much advertised SDG’s policies.
While many Africans battle so hard to grapple with harsh realities and hostilities of their host countries ranging from racism, prejudice, little or too rigid legal documentation processes for immigrants, and biting chances of economic survival, many have also become susceptible to illegal drug dealings which in most cases often result in cruel fate or even avoidable deaths.
The sad news on the passing of Sound Sultan, one of Nigeria’s notable songwriter, artist, producer, and comedian, who few days ago was reported to have lost the battle to a cancerous related aliment around the throat, brings with it feelings of pain, grief, and national loss. By national loss, Nigeria just lost a voice and a social crusader reputed for his numerous campaigns against bad governance, injustice, corruption, and bad leadership a major clog in the wheel of Nigeria’s progress. He will fondly be remembered for his many statesmanly roles towards mobilizing the citizens through his several songs on how to constructively hold them accountable to their constitutional functions.
To the memory of the Late Singer, President Muhammadu Buhari also pen a glowing tribute to him for his contribution to basketball development in Nigeria. He was even reported to have co-owned a basketball team. D’ Tigers, Nigerian Men Basketball National team would also honor the late singer by wearing T-shirts bearing the late singer’s name and image on it, for his roles in promoting the sports. Coincidentally, his death would also leave a lasting memory following D’Tiger’s phenomenal triumph over the US Men Basketball National team, a feat no African team had ever done, the same day he was said to have died.
The Motherland crooner died at age 44 in the US and his remains have since been buried in the US, same day, according to Islamic rites, leaving behind his three kids and his beloved wife.
By Segun Adesokan

Continue Reading

Trending News