Connect with us

Opinion

The Yoruba Nation Global Directorate rebuttal to the Yoruba Appraisal Forum

Published

on

 

The Yoruba Nation Global Directorate, the Yoruba government in exile, has lambasted the group otherwise known as YAF being the Yoruba Appraisal Forum for visiting some prominent Yoruba Royal fathers to mislead them with their anti-people position in Yoruba struggle.

In a statement issued by the Directorate Director, Princess Adeola Atayero Olamijulo, YAF said like the proverbial ‘agbalagba to nsare l’orere, bi o le nkan, nkankan ni lati maa lee.’

She said Yoruba people needed to observe closely who are their sponsors?

They need to honestly tell the world who are the drummers of these Uromis dancing on Yoruba socio-political waterway?

It will be recalled that few days ago, the YAF paid some Yoruba Obas a courtesy call. The Royal fathers in their response advised against self-determination and asked the agitators to tow the path of peace with the federal government.

Prince Olamijulo said YAF, are like, the name they bear. They appeared to have appraised the Yoruba nation, it perceives as a commodity to be sold to the highest bidder.

She said: Let us examine the major points of their advocacy:

1. that the Yoruba should continue to endure the current Fulani-induced meta-crisis in Nigeria.

2. That advocacy for Yoruba self-determination may lead to war with the rest of Nigeria.

3 That the prevailing clamor for Yoruba self-determination efforts is fueled by selfish interests of some politicians.

4. That Nigeria was the architect of economic success of the South West.

5. They urge the Youths to seek the available gainful employment rather than agitate for autonomy.

6. That YAF needs to answer the question, whose actions are provocative and war laden?

7. Who is misappropriating the power entrusted to them: the government impostors implementing the Fulani national interests instead of the true Nigerian national interests?

8. Who is the aggressor who is the victim? Who is killing, maiming, raping, and scorched-earthing who?

Princess Atayero Olamijulo claimed that the Yoruba are on the receiving end of the atrocities. Yet, YAF is asking us to stay-put, till it is too late to be viable.

She positioned that normally, if faced with danger, humans have the options to fight, flee or succumb.

What is YAF asking the Yoruba nation to do?

Will the Yoruba remain and submit to Fulani supremacist control? or will they take flight and disperse to the sea or the desert, Or turn global waka-abouts and live in virtual nation state, located only in their collective epic memory; while the Fulani occupy and enjoy the land and the valuables therein that Yoruba and their ancestors built up for ages?

Is YAF asking the Yoruba to take the submission option to appease the Fulani and become their slaves or manure to fertilize their usurped land?

YAF apparently is exhibiting the pathological state indicative of the protracted abuse they suffered in Nigeria over time. They now identify with their chronic abuser, a function of Stockholm syndrome. YAF, seems apparently bribed by the preserver of the status quo, who obviously derive immense benefits from the present chaotic state in Nigeria.

Let us appeal to YAF sponsors to stay away from confusing our traditional rulers. They should desist from smearing our royal fathers with their pathological state of mindset.

We should let sanity prevail. Let us draw a lesson from history. The stalwarts in quest for Yoruba freedom should take a cue form history.

We cannot continue to appease the Fulani nationalism aimed at destroying other ‘Nigerians’. Rather, we should resist it. It will boomerang on the Yoruba Survival Thrust if we pursue an appeasement strategy.

Appeasement of the aggressor never succeeds in human history: The Chamberlain 1938 appeasement policy to Adolf Hitler, led to World War II, gory warfare.

Princess Olamijulo recalled that the Native Americans successive appeasement to the invading Europeans led to the demise of the Native American (NA) nations. NA yielded their treasured land to the European settlers, adopted their religion, spoke their language, and way of life to appease the Europeans, yet, to no avail. What did they get in return: annihilation! The Yoruba have no choice, but to fight for self-determination. Any other suggestion will doom our group survival.

We can also draw further lessons from recent history of the other struggles for self-determination in Zimbabwe and South Africa. In Rhodesia, Iain Smith, illegally enacted white minority regime via the ill-fated Unilateral Declaration of Independence- UDI, from Britain, 1965.

The Africans opposed and a series of negotiations with the intransigent racist regime failed.

The Africans, led by Joshua Nkomo and Robert Mugabe, opposed Smith regime via the Patriotic Front insurgency.

When the opposition were gaining diplomatic and military success, to buy time, the illegal regime sought alliance with the traditional ruler, Chief Sikireta Chirau, the cleric pacifist, Bishop Abel Muzorewa and politician, Ndabaningi Sitole Smith renamed the country Zimbabwe Rhodesia, to reflect the alliance. The PF team were smart to refuse and the rest is history. The independent nation of Zimbabwe was born.
Identical situation happened in South Africa.

When the efforts of the African Congress alliance were about to yield fruitful result, the apartheid regime forged unholy alliance with the Zulu and other tribal chiefs, to slow down the apparent progress ANC was making diplomatically and to a lesser extent, militarily via insurgency. Chief Gatsha Buthelezi, lured by conservative Boers, introduced what he called, Ndaba initiative to dialogue between the Africans and the racist regime of South Africa. The ill-conceived ploy failed. The ANC triumphed and Apartheid disbanded.

Princess Olamijulo advised that the Yoruba freedom fighters should not relent their efforts. Victory is near and certain, because, Otito nii leke iro, Truth shall prevail. Lori otito la gbe ijangbara Yoruba le. Awa laa l eke, bi ojuoro ṣe n leke omi. Ase o

Trending News

Oil Giant Oando Plc: Ensuring Gender Parity

Published

on

By

Globalization has led to a discourse on leadership and management having different perspectives. Today, one of the discourses includes gender diversity in leadership positions across organizations. While the African continent comes third after the United States and Europe, and first amongst other emerging regions in terms of women’s representation on boardrooms of top listed companies, some sectors are doing better than others. In Nigeria, Africa’s largest economy, the banking sector is leading the pack. In what many observers have described as a paradigm shift, the Nigerian banking sector is currently seeing a surge in the number of women at its top echelon. Presently, eight women serve as Chief Executive Officers (CEOs)/Managing Directors (MDs) of the country’s leading banks.

Other sectors, especially the energy sector, hitherto a male dominated sector, is towing the line.  Shell Nigeria unveiled its first female Managing Director for deep-water Nigeria, last year. Most recently, Oando Plc, Nigeria’s leading indigenous energy solutions provider appointed two seasoned professional women to its board of Directors, Mrs. Ronke Sokefun and Mrs. Nana Fatima Mede.

A review of Oando’s culture shows that it’s been conscious of the imbalance within the sector and as such, has always prioritized two things: strengthening indigenous capacity and ensuring gender parity wherever possible. Today 43 per cent of the company’s workforce is female, compared to 22 per cent across the industry. Of this, 33% of executive-level employees are female with the hope that its female representation on its board continues to grow.

In an interview published in 2020 for Africa Oil Week, an Oando Executive said “As leaders, our focus is on building the most desirable company in which to work and invest. To do that, not only do you require vision, ambition, and passionate people, you need a balance of ideas and characters – which you get by prioritizing gender parity. Our desire to see a more gender-balanced company and in turn sector via proactive action has fuelled our commitment to making gender diversity a priority. This commitment is effected in every part of our business, from the offering of benefits that encourage women to return to work after maternity leave to our charity, Oando Foundation focusing on educating the girl child; reverberations that can be felt not only within our business but also the community at large. We have seen and reaped the benefits of a more inclusive business environment and thus inclusivity will always be a priority, one that we will champion until the industry achieves gender balance.”

Mrs. Sokefun, an Alumni of Oando, has over 35 years of work experience. In 2002, she moved to the Oando Group, where within a few years she rose to the position of Chief Legal Officer. During this period, she also sat on the Board of the telecom’s giant – Celtel/Zain (now Airtel) as an alternate Director. She served in this position until 2011 when she was called to public service in Ogun State and proceeded to serve as a 2-term Commissioner – holding diverse portfolios – under Senator Ibikunle Amosun’s 2-term administration as Ogun State Governor.

As conversations on climate change and harnessing sustainable energy sources continue to intensify, oil and gas companies are looking for ways to improve on their operations in line with global standards and requirements. In line with this, Oando appointed Mrs. Nana Fatima Mede, who has served as a Federal Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Environment where she coordinated the formulation of the Nigerian Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC) document on Greenhouse Gases (GHG) in relation to Climate Change – a document which was presented by the President at the Conference of Party (COP 21) in Paris, 2015. She will showcased her expertise on clean energy to support the company’s ambitions.

The growth of female representation across corporate boards shows that unlocking the potential of Africa’s successful transformation requires concurrently removing barriers to women’s leadership and participation.

Continue Reading

Opinion

THE MAKING OF AN OLUBADAN

Published

on

By

By: Mogaji Wole Arisekola

 

 

Every family and clan in Ibadanland has a Mogaji. Mogajis are family heads. They control the affairs of their family and ensure law and order. They are made Mogajis by the Olubadan after they have been so appointed and the family written to formally inform the Olubadan and the Council. In Ibadan, there are over 2,500 Mogajis or family heads at present. The installation ceremony of Mogajis is often performed at the palace of the Olubadan with pomp and fanfare. A Mogaji is a potential Olubadan in waiting if he eventually succeeds to join the ladder. It takes a whole lot for a Mogaji to become Jagun, the lowest rung of the Olubadan ladder, as there are competitions from other Mogajis.

To become Jagun, however, Baale Ayorinde said there are three things to consider. A prospective candidate could be from an historical Ibadan warrior family or having done valiantly to save the land in one form or another. The candidate might also have done something worthwhile for his community or Ibadanland as a whole, while his wealth, which he had used for the uplift of the downtrodden, could be another consideration.

When there is vacancy for the Jagun position, the Olubadan-in-council would consider the prospective candidates and hereby appoint one to the Olubadan line or another to the Balogun line, depending on where there is vacancy. The appointees would now become Jagun on either and or both lines. The promotions of such Jaguns are not, however, random, as they are promoted in a sequential and orderly procedure. Upon vacancy in any of the lines, the title holder of a lower rung is promoted to the next rung of the ladder. The Balogun line has 23 rungs while the Olubadan line has 22 rungs. The next Olubadan alternates between the Balogun and the Otun

 

Mogaji Wole Arisekola

The promotion in the line of Balogun follows this pattern: From Jagun – Ajia – Bada – Are-Onibon – Gbonnka – Aare Egbe Omo – Oota – Lagunna – Are-Ago – Ayingun – Asaju – Ikolaba – Aare-Alasa – Agba-Akin – Ekefa – Maye –Abese – Ekarun Balogun – Ekerin Balogun – Ashipa Balogun – Osi Balogun – Otun Balogun and eventually to Balogun. The journey from Jagun to Balogun will take a prospective candidate through a 23-rung ladder, and, having reached the top of the ladder, he becomes Balogun and would, therefore, wait for his turn to emerge the Olubadan of Ibadanland.

The promotion in the line of Olubadan follows the same pattern, but is 22 rungs : From Jagun – Ajia – Bada – Aare Onibon – Gbonnka – Aare-Egbe Omo – Oota – Lagunna – Are-Ago – Ayingun – Asaju – Ikolaba – Aare-Alasa – Agba-Akin – Ekefa – Maye – Abese – Ekarun Olubadan – Ekerin Olubadan – Ashipa Olubadan – Osi Olubadan and finally to Otun Olubadan. The nomenclature looks the same with that of Balogun, until when the prospective candidate finally gets to the Ekarun Olubadan. Upon emergence as the Otun Olubadan, the candidate is set to emerge the next Olubadan of Ibadan land on his turn.

Baale Ayorinde gave English meanings of some of the titles thus: Otun – second in command/Commander of the right wing; Osi – third in command/Commander of the left wing; Asipa – Leader of the Vanguard; Ekerin – Fourth in Command; Ekarun – Fifth in Command; Abese – Superintendent of foot soldiers; Maye – Stationary Veteran Soldiers; Ekefa – Sixth in command; Agba-Akin – Chief of the Brave; Aare-Alasa – Chief of the Squire; Ikolaba – Sango’s apron man; Asaaju – Front ranker (front liner); Ayingun – Official war wager; Aare-Ago – Overseer of Blood Relations; Laguna – Swivel Lance Comptroller General; Oota – Sharp Shooter; Aare-Egbe-Omo – General of the Youth Wing; Gbonka – Dignified war wager; Aare-Onibon – Brigadier-General of Gun Combatant Shooter; Bada – Chief Spy; Ajia – Commissioner; Jagun – Warrior/Defender of the ruler.

When death occurs of any member on the ladder, there has to be installation ceremony to the next rank for affected candidates not less than 21 days after the burial of the last occupant. The Olubadan, upon notification of such death, will approve the promotion of others and perform installation ceremony for them at the palace. This is one of the reasons Ibadan chiefs are called Agbotikuyo (someone who rejoices at the death of another candidate).
Ori mi Dara,pe Ibadan ,ni won bi mi ooo eeee.Ibadan,ilu alaafe ilu oloye ti wa ni,ori mi dara,pe Ibadan ,ni won bi mi oóooo eeeee.

 

 

 

 

©️ Mogaji Wole Arisekola

Continue Reading

Trending News

Apostle Suleman’s Unique Gifts, Healing and Prophecy @Yuletide

Published

on

By

 

Nothing is as beautiful as a man of God going beyond the pulpit to shower love on the people especially during the festive season. He is actually making them have the feeling that they are indeed valued and that God loves them. A few days before Christmas 2021, servant of God and Senior Pastor at the Omega Fire Ministries (OFM) worldwide, Apostle Johnson Suleman, began with his regular sharing of love by blessing members of the public with various kinds of gifts including cash, foods and expensive materials.

 

As one of the God-given Christian leaders, Suleman has always engaged in charitable giving which undeniably is a huge motivating factor that spurs many to give. Such an act from men of God like Suleman is also a big reason why individual giving in Nigeria has continued to rise despite the country’s slow economy.

 

He did not stop at that, a day before Christmas, Apostle Suleman had visited hospitals in Edo State where the headquarters of his Ministry is located, to pray for the sick for quick and divine healing while he also donated millions in cash for their treatment and restoration afterwards. Also, a day after Christmas, a young boy born with sealed lips enjoyed the mercy of God through Suleman who prayed and have the boy’s lips open, to the shouts of Hallelujah by worshippers at the capacity-filled post-Christmas special service at the OFM headquarters.

 

Asked what informs his passion for regular giving, the ‘Restoration Apostle’ posited that, “God wants to love the world through us and the world needs to experience God’s love through us. Love is our propelling force, love is our heartbeat, it powers every move, every action and inaction. Love is the express reflection of God’s heart. That should explain why we make sharing our priority.”

 

Outside charity, Apostle Suleman also explores his unique opportunity to propel the Christendom forward with power and vision. Many times, his divine messages, including yearly prophecies, have been confirmed accurate. It is, however, not debatable that the growth of Suleman’s OFM, with branches located in most of the world’s capital cities, is based mainly on his successes in healing, sharing and his ability to accurately predict future events.

 

As precisely foretold in one of Suleman’s past prophecies, Edo State now has the approval of the federal government to build a new airport. Apostle Suleman had said in 2020 that, “I saw aircrafts and white people around the Auchi axis. The construction will commence in 2022 and will be completed in the same year.” Auchi is a popular town in Edo State and the new airport will be built in Uzairue, a town close to Auchi.

 

 

Sharing their joy, the beneficiaries are thanking Apostle Suleman “for his heart of love and empathy for humanity.”

Continue Reading

Trending News